August 2022 was the hottest August ever recorded in B.C.

August 2022 was the hottest August ever recorded in B.C. with an average temperature of 20.3 C, according to records taken at Vancouver’s airport.

In addition, Global BC meteorologist Kristi Gordon said this past August was the second hottest month ever recorded.

July 1958 is still the hottest month ever in B.C. with an average temp of 20.6 C.

From June to August this year, a mean temperature of 18.3 C was recorded, which is above the average of 17.2 C and is the sixth-hottest summer ever, Gordon added.

Last year, 2021, was the second-hottest summer ever.


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Gordon said Fort St John, Abbotsford, Kelowna, Vernon and Penticton all recorded their hottest months ever in August and dozens of regions across the province broke daily high temperatures in both July and August.

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August was not only very hot but it was also very dry, Gordon added.

In the past six weeks, Vancouver International Airport recorded only 3.6 mm of rain when typically an average of 36.7 mm would fall.

B.C. has five drought levels, with five being the most severe.

Some areas of B.C. have been declared Level 3 due to dry and hot conditions.

Eastern Vancouver Island, western Vancouver Island and Haida Gwaii are all under Level 3 conditions. The high temperatures, consistent sunshine and lack of recent rain have increased water temperatures in numerous Vancouver Island and Haida Gwaii streams, according to the Ministry of Environment.


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The warmer water and lack of precipitation could affect fishing and salmon spawning migration.

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The ministry said there have already been reports of fish mortalities and strandings over the past month following heat warnings.

Warmer water temperatures and the lack of precipitation may affect late summer fish-rearing conditions in streams and can affect the timing of salmon spawning migration.

Any fish strandings or mortalities can be reported to the Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) hotline at 1-877-952-7277.

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